Class 10 Elective Travel Tourism and Hospitality Chapter 3 Gender and Age Sensitive Service Practices

Class 10 Elective Travel Tourism and Hospitality Chapter 3 Gender and Age Sensitive Service Practices Question answer to each chapter is provided in the list so that you can easily browse throughout different chapters SEBA Class 10 Elective Travel Tourism and Hospitality Chapter 3 Gender and Age Sensitive Service Practices Notes PDF and select need one.

Class 10 Elective Travel Tourism and Hospitality Chapter 3 Gender and Age Sensitive Service Practices

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Also, you can read the SCERT book online in these sections Solutions by Expert Teachers as per SCERT (CBSE) Book guidelines. These solutions are part of SCERT All Subject Solutions. Here we have given Assam Board Class 10 Elective Travel Tourism and Hospitality Chapter 3 Gender and Age Sensitive Service Practices Solutions for All Subject, You can practice these here.

Gender and Age Sensitive Service Practices

Chapter – 3

A. State ‘True’ or ‘False’.

1. It is a legal obligation for any company or organisation to maintain a workplace free from sexual harassment. 

Ans: True.

2. A woman employee should have minimum 80 working days to her credit in the last 12 months counting from the start of the maternity leave, to be eligible for maternity benefits. 

Ans: True.

3. Vishaka guidelines were promulgated by the Indian Supreme Court in 1999. 

Ans: False. 

4. The most effective weapon against sexual harassment is complaint. 

Ans: Do yourself.

5. In order to ensure the safety of women employees, many companies provide official transport. 

Ans: Do yourself.

B. Subjective Questions:

1. What should be a company’s policies to prevent sexual harassment?

Ans: A sexual harassment policy must be framed, which should: 

(i) Define sexual harassment. 

(ii) State in no uncertain terms that the company will not tolerate sexual harassment. 

(iii) State that the company will discipline or fire any wrongdoers. 

(iv) Set out a clear procedure for filing sexual harassment complaints. 

(v) State that the company will fully investigate any complaint that it receives, and will not tolerate retaliation against anyone who complains about sexual harassment.

2. Write the facilities available for a woman traveler’s safety and security.

Ans: As per industry experts, 10–18 per cent of their guests comprise single women travelers. Indian hotels have begun to understand that single women travelers is a fast growing, niche market and has tremendous potential. Women don’t mind paying for a service as long as it is worth it. Understanding this customer base is an important factor in translating marketing into sales for hotels. Hotels that often perceive their guests as only men could be losing a lot of clientele if their practices or facilities are not tailored to suit women guests. With the change in trends, where more and more women are now travelling for official trips to different cities, ensuring their safety and security is of utmost priority. Hotels have now started becoming more conscious of this aspect and are adopting various methods to ensure good service to the women guests. Specially-designed single lady programmes help hotels to assure their women guests of a safe and sound environment. 

The following are the basic guidelines adopted by various hotels for providing a safe and secure environment to women travelers:

(i) When allocating a room to a single woman traveler, try to look for a room in the middle of the floor. 

(ii) Lone women travelers should be automatically upgraded to the next available room type. 

(iii) Offer escort service from the hotel car park, especially at night. 

(iv) Provide well lit, on site car park with CCTV. 

(v) Ensure to install peepholes on the entrance doors of all rooms for added security and make sure to inform single or lone female travelers of the same. 

(vi) Never give out a single woman traveler’s name or room number.

(vii) There should be bedside lighting controls as a standard norm in all rooms.

(viii) Police helpline number: The Government has launched a helpline number 1800111363 or in short 1363 for women 

tourists visiting India as part of its Incredible India initiative.

3. Write the common safety measures adopted for the safety and security of women employees. 

Ans: The common safety measure adopted for the and security of women employees are mentioned below: 

(i) CCTV: Cameras Though the workplace may be a secure area, common places such as washrooms, smoking areas and cafés may pose a threat. A simple measure which is commonly adopted is CCTV. CCTV surveillance is essential in common places. It is important to have a CCTV on the way to the restroom. All such areas should have proper lights and the doors should have functional latches. A female security guard should be posted near the restroom.

(ii) Anti-sexual harassment committee: It is a company’s responsibility to maintain a workplace that is free of sexual harassment. Apart from being a legal obligation, it also makes good business sense. A company that does not curb sexual harassment at the workplace, ends up paying a high price in terms of poor employee morale, low productivity and lawsuits. Every organisation has an Anti-Sexual Harassment Committee. The police forms a detailed mechanism for it and women employees can make complaints when sexual harassment occurs.

(iii) Women’s helpline: Apart from sexual harassment policies, women helpline numbers are also displayed in common public areassuch as washrooms, cafeterias, etc., in case of an emergency. National Women’s Helpline service is to serve only, or predominantly, women who are victims of violence.

4. Write a note on women’s rights and respect at the workplace.

Ans: Women’s rights in the workplace include many facets of women safety and dignity, including the right to work during pregnancy. Thus, an employer cannot refuse job or turn out a woman due to her pregnancy as long as she can perform satisfactorily. This means that employers cannot deny hiring any person due to gender or pregnancy. The Law also prohibits sexual harassment of a woman at workplace by any co-worker, employer or visitor. This includes an antagonistic work environment where a woman is subjected to sexual comments, touching or unwanted sexual advances that put her in fear of losing her job if she does not comply. Women should report all such advances to the Supervisor or an appropriate authority. Due to workplace rights, women enjoy freedom to work in almost any position she chooses. Women can become executives in large corporations, join the armed forces, work as cab drivers and can even own businesses. As the financial status of women increases, so does the welfare of their families, children and the nation.

A. State ‘True’ or ‘False’.

1. The hotel service ensures that single women travelers receive rooms far from the elevator. 

Ans: False.

2. Many hotels have basic medical facilities to provide prompt and dedicated healthcare support to their guests. 

Ans: True.

3. Guest travelling with children, parents or relatives are called corporate guests. 

Ans: False.

4. Luxury hotels sometimes have adjoining rooms for children to provide the guests with more space and privacy, this service is chargeable. 

Ans: True.

5. Recreational activities are often done for enjoyment or pleasure and are considered to be ‘fun-loving activities’

Ans: True.

B. Subjective Questions: 

1. Discuss the general facilities available at hotels for each age group. 

Ans: Facilities and services should be designed, provided and maintained to ensure the safety and emotional well-being of children, the elderly and young people. The following are the general facilities provided by any hotel for each age and gender: Children-

(i) Children’s pools with slides. 

(ii) Baby care station. 

(iii) Mini Club or Playground. 

(iv) Children’s toilet seats.

(v)  Electricity plug covers. 

(vi) Tennis lessons (on extra charge).

(vii) Animation, mini disco. 

(vii)  Babysitting (on extra charge). 

(viii) Cots.

2. Write a note on recreational facilities for children tourists. 

Ans: The prime reason for people travelling with family is recreation for themselves and their children. Thus, availability of safe and enjoyable recreational activities for children is a basic expectation when people choose to stay in a family hotel. The elders don’t want to be worried about keeping an eye on their children while staying in a hotel. Family hotels have rooms furnished. keeping the needs of young families in mind. Hotels also provide additional equipment to make a holiday with babies and toddlers as easy as possible. Interesting indoor and outdoor recreational activities would make sure that children have an enjoyable and unforgettable stay at the hotel. All recreational facilities for children are always under the supervision of attentive qualified staff. 

3. What are the facilities required for a business traveler in a hotel? 

Ans: Business travellers need a comfortable place to sleep, work, and relax, as well as reliable transportation to get to their meetings and appointments. Access to technology is also essential, as employees embarking on corporate travel need to stay connected and productive while on the road.

4. Explain the basic amenities for young single women guests in a hotel.

Ans: Hotels in India have now begun taking the Single Lady Traveler concept seriously and have introduced amenities to make their stay safe and comfortable like offering them rooms next to or near the elevator or stairway and more. Famous hotel brand like ITC have a dedicated floor for the Single Lady Travelers.

Check Your Progress:

A. Fill in the Blank

1. ____________ has to be cultivated and nurtured by one’s own self. 

Ans: Patience.

2. Never say ____________ to any demand of a product or service made by a guest until you are sure to provide it.

Ans: No.

3. Avoid using an ____________ accent. 

Ans: Artificia.

4. Lifelong learning is an _____________.

Ans: Investment.

B. Subjective Questions: 

1. Briefly explain the measures that could be adopted for equality of women at workplace. 

Ans: Companies around the world are currently going through a period of transformation and change. Some are expanding their business globally while some are wondering how the change will impact their organisation. As we know, men and women are entering the labour force in equal numbers but the majority of top management positions still belong to men. Still, discrimination on the basis of sex at the workplace remains a problem as social norms continue to restrict occupational choices by women, thereby distorting labour markets, depressing wages, and hurting business innovation and productivity. Women are often unable to break the upper levels of corporate management due to glass ceiling’. The term ‘glass ceiling’ refers to situations or an unacknowledged barrier where the advancement of a qualified person within the hierarchy of an organisation is stopped at a lower level because of some form of discrimination, most commonly sexism or racism. There are many reasons behind this. One of them is job segregation. It is the concentration of women and men in different types and levels of activity and employment. Usually, men tend to be highly concentrated in the professions like that of managers, supervisors, production supervisors and executives. Women, on the other hand, tend to be involved in lesser paid professions such as teachers, secretaries, receptionists and nurses. Sadly, there are many barriers that prevent women from reaching one of the higher positions in an organisation. One of the barriers is the work environment. Organisational culture, employees’ attitude and racial stereotypes commonly limit women from actively participating in the organisation. Working parents, especially mothers, usually have to deal with family obligations. They often have to choose between their job and family for which they require flexible hours at work. The concept of spending equal time with the family by all genders is still not culturally popular in India.

2. List a few effective ways to motivate women at the workplace.

Ans: The following are a few effective ways to motivate women at the workplace are mentioned below: 

(i) Make mentoring a must: Provide opportunities for women to align themselves with a corporate leader who can coach, guide and help them professionally. This demonstrates your seriousness when it comes to the growth of your female workforce.

(ii) Leverage the power of a personal sponsor: Some women advance faster and stronger with a sponsorship, especially when they’ve proven themselves but still find themselves stuck. Sponsors can bat for them and advocate their advancement within the company.

(iii) Put some creativity into rewards: When a woman employee truly goes above and beyond, a cash bonus may not always be the best way to recognise the achievement. Keep in mind the value of a day off with pay to allow them time to catch up on personal enjoyments, attend a family event or deal with household responsibilities.

(iv) Give choice in leading a project: In male-dominated departments, it is easy to draw on the same 10 people or the typical ‘go to’ person for leading a project or completing an important task. Consider entrusting such tasks to a woman employee and give them an opportunity to showcase their abilities and grow. Show trust in women employees also.

(v) Lifelong learning is an investment: Most companies have educational reimbursement plans for formal, long-term programmes. But many women are single parents or caretakers for elderly parents and such a commitment is very cumbersome. Consider offering one to two days of skill development programmes and allow your female employees the chance to hone everyday skills needed to grow on the job.

(vi) Express appreciation: Often women tend to do a better job of expressing appreciation and they also like to receive spoken and written forms of acknowledgement more often than men. Stop and give frequent and specific thanks throughout the day or at every stage of a project roll-out.

(vii) Check how they want to be heard: When a woman shares a problem, check to see if they just want to vent or whether they want your involvement in solving the problem, since many times, women just want to verbalise and share things to feel better. On the contrary, men are more likely to get shared problems fixed.

(viii) Show consistent respect and courtesy: Make sure your managers and supervisors understand the value of day-to-day recognition and are appropriately trained in expressing genuine respect for work and effort all year long.

(ix) Reward equally and fairly: If there is one thing that irritates anyone, male or female, is seeing someone receive a pay raise, an award, or some form of recognition when they feel deserving too. All organisations should establish clear quantitative or measurable criteria and parameters that are used to evaluate performance and distribution of rewards.

A. State ‘True’ or ‘False’.

1. It is a legal obligation for any company or organigation to maintain a workplace free from sexual harassment.

Ans: True.

2. A women employee should have minimum 80 working days to her credit in the last 12 month counting from the start of the manternity leave , to be eligible for manternity benefits.

Ans: True.

3. Vishaka guidelines were promuglted by the indian supreme court 1999.

Ans: False.

4. The most  effective wepon against sexual harasment is complaint.

Ans: False.

5. In order to ensure safety of women employees , many companies provide official transport .

Ans: True.

Subjective Questions:

1. What should ba a company ‘s policies to prevent sexual harassment?

Ans: It is a company’s responsibility to maintain a workplace that is free of sexual harassment. It is not only its legal obligation but is also good business sense. If we allow sexual harassment to grow at the workplace, it will result in poor employee morale and low productivity. The laws that prohibit gender discrimination also automatically prohibit sexual harassment.

2. Write the facilities available for a women traveler’s safety and security.

Ans: women travellers should have easy access to elevators, well-lit corridors, and their rooms should be located in safe and easily accessible areas. Emergency exits and evacuation plans should be clearly marked and easily understood.

3. Write the common safety measures adopted for the safety and security of women employees: 

Ans: The important safety measures for female employees during night shifts include:

(i) Secure Transportation Options. 

(ii) Safe Drop-Off Points. 

(iii) Mandatory Buddy System. 

(iv) Robust Security Measures. 

(v) Self-Defense Training. 

4. Write a note on women’s rights and respects at the workplace.

Ans: Women’s rights in the workplace include many facets of women safety and dignity, including the right to work during pregnancy. Thus, an employer cannot refuse job or turn out a woman due to her pregnancy as long as she can perform satisfactorily. This means that employers cannot deny hiring any person due to gender or pregnancy. The Law also prohibits sexual harassment of a woman at workplace by any co-worker, employer or visitor. This includes an antagonistic work environment where a woman is subjected to sexual comments, touching or unwanted sexual advances that put her in fear of losing her job if she does not comply. Women should report all such advances to the Supervisor or an appropriate authority.

Check Your Progress:

1. The hotel service ensures that single women travelers received rooms far from the elevator.

Ans: Ensuring that single women travelers receive rooms far from the elevator can be seen as a safety and privacy measure. However, it’s important to approach this policy thoughtfully and respectfully. 

Here’s a detailed consideration of the practice:

(i) Safety: Rooms far from the elevator can potentially reduce the chances of unwanted attention or encounters with strangers, as elevators are high-traffic areas.

(ii) Noise Reduction: Rooms away from the elevator are often quieter, providing a more comfortable and restful stay.

(iii) Privacy: These rooms can offer more privacy, as fewer people pass by them.

2. Many hotels have basic medical facilities to provide prompt and dedicated healthcare support to their guest.

Ans: Do yourself.

3. Guest traveling with children, parents or relatives are called corporate guest.

Ans: Do yourself.

4. Luxury hotels sometimes have adjoining rooms for children to provide the guest with more space and privacy, this service is changeable.

Ans: Do yourself.

5. Recreational activities are often done for enjoyment or pleasure and considered to be fun- loving activities.

Ans: Recreation is an activity of leisure, leisure being discretionary time. The “need to do something for recreation” is an essential element of human biology and psychology. Recreational activities are often done for enjoyment, amusement, or pleasure and are considered to be “fun”.

Subjectives Questions:

1. Discuss the general facilities available at Hotels for each age group.

Ans: Hotels aim to create a welcoming environment for guests of all ages by offering a range of facilities tailored to meet their specific needs and preferences. 

Here’s a detailed look at the general facilities available at hotels for different age groups:

(i) Infants and Toddlers (0-3 years).

Facilities:

(a) Cribs and Cots: Available upon request to ensure safe sleeping arrangements.

(b) High Chairs: Provided in dining areas for easier feeding.

(c) Baby Baths: Small bathtubs available for infant bathing.

(d) Bottle Warmers and Sterilizers: Essential for preparing baby bottles.

(e) Babysitting Services: Professional babysitters can be arranged.

(f) Baby-Proofing: Baby-proofing kits or baby-proofed rooms available upon request.

(ii) Young Children (4-12 years).

Facilities:

(a) Kids’ Clubs: Supervised activities, crafts, games, and entertainment tailored for children.

(b) Children’s Pools: Shallow pools with water slides and fun water features.

(c) Playgrounds: Outdoor play areas with swings, slides, and climbing structures.

(d) Game Rooms: Equipped with video games, board games, and other interactive activities.

Kids’ Menus: Special menus in restaurants with child-friendly options.

(e) Family Rooms: Larger rooms or suites with additional bedding options, sometimes themed.

2. Write a note on recreational facilities for children tourists.

Ans: The prime reason for people travelling with family is recreation for themselves and their children. Thus, availability of safe and enjoyable recreational activities for children is a basic expectation when people choose to stay in a family hotel. The elders don’t want to be worried about keeping an eye on their children while staying in a hotel. Family hotels have rooms furnished keeping the needs of young families in mind. Hotels also provide additional equipment to make a holiday with babies and toddlers as easy as possible. Interesting indoor and outdoor recreational activities would make sure that children have an enjoyable and unforgettable stay at the hotel. All recreational facilities for children are always under the supervision of attentive qualified staff. 

3. What are the facilities required for a business travelers in a hotel?

Ans: The facilities required for a business travelers in a hotel are mentioned below: 

(i) Great location.

(ii) Concierge service.   

(iii) Business facilities. 

(iv) Chauffeur service. 

(v) Onsite dining options. 

(vi) Multiple workspaces.

4. Explain the basic amenities for young single women guests in a hotel.

Ans: Hotels in India have now begun taking the Single Lady Traveler concept seriously and have introduced amenities to make their stay safe and comfortable like offering them rooms next to or near the elevator or stairway and more. Famous hotel brand like ITC have a dedicated floor for the Single Lady Travelers.

Check Your Progress:

A. Fill in the banks.

1. _________has to be cultivated and nurtured to one’s own self.

Ans: Self-confidence.

2. Never say __________ to any demand of product or service made by a guest until you are sure to provide it.

Ans: yes.

3. Avoid using _________ an gecent.

Ans: Slang and jargon in speech.

4. Lifelong learning is an____________.

Ans: Ongoing process.

B. Objective Questions:

1. Briefly explain the measures that could be adopted for equality of women at workplace.

Ans: Companies around the world are currently going through a period of transformation and change. Some are expanding their business globally while some are wondering how the change will impact their organisation. As we know, men and women are entering the labour force in equal numbers but the majority of top management positions still belong to men. Still, discrimination on the basis of sex at the workplace remains a problem as social norms continue to restrict occupational choices by women, thereby distorting labour markets, depressing wages, and hurting business innovation and productivity. Women are often unable to break the upper levels of corporate management due to glass ceiling’. The term ‘glass ceiling’ refers to situations or an unacknowledged barrier where the advancement of a qualified person within the hierarchy of an organisation is stopped at a lower level because of some form of discrimination, most commonly sexism or racism There are many reasons behind this. 

One of them is job segregation. It is the concentration of women and men in different types and levels of activity and employment. Usually, men tend to be highly concentrated in the professions like that of managers, supervisors, production supervisors and executives. Women, on the other hand, tend to be involved in lesser paid professions such as teachers, secretaries, receptionists and nurses. Sadly, there are many barriers that prevent women from reaching one of the higher positions in an organisation. One of the barriers is the work environment. Organisational culture, employees’ attitude and racial stereotypes commonly limit women from actively participating in the organisation. Working parents, especially mothers, usually have to deal with family obligations. They often have to choose between their job and family for which they require flexible hours at work. The concept of spending equal time with the family by all genders is still not culturally popular in India.

2. List a few effective ways to motivate women at the workplace.

Ans: Although women are dynamic leaders of change, they still have a long way to go when it comes to equal representation in positions of power and leadership, both in corporate boardrooms and presidential cabinets. Discriminatory laws and practices hold women back, as do limits on education, income and time away from care giving. 

The following are a few effective ways to motivate women at the workplace:

(i) Provide opportunities for women to align themselves with a corporate leader who can coach, guide and help them professionally. This demonstrates your seriousness when it comes to the growth of your female workforce.

(ii) Leverage the power of a personal sponsor: Some women advance faster and stronger with a sponsorship, especially when they’ve proven themselves but still find themselves stuck. Sponsors can bat for them and advocate their advancement within the compan.

(iii) Put some creativity into rewards: When a woman employee truly goes above and beyond, a cash bonus may not always be the best way to recognise the achievement. Keep in mind the value of a day off with pay to allow them time to catch up on personal enjoyments, attend a family event or deal with household responsibilities.

(iv) Give choice in leading a project: In male-dominated departments, it is easy to draw on the same 10 people or the typical ‘go to’ person for leading a project or completing an important task. Consider entrusting such tasks to a woman employee and give them an opportunity to showcase their abilities and grow. Show trust in women employees also.

(v) Lifelong learning is an investment: Most companies have educational reimbursement plans for formal, long-term programmes. But many women are single parents or caretakers for elderly parents and such a commitment is very cumbersome. Consider offering one to two days of skill development programmes and allow your female employees the chance to hone everyday skills needed to grow on the job.

(vi) Express appreciation: Often women tend to do a better job of expressing appreciation and they also like to receive spoken and written forms of acknowledgement more often than men. Stop and give frequent and specific thanks throughout the day or at every stage of a project roll-out.

(vii) Check how they want to be heard: When a woman shares a problem, check to see if they just want to vent or whether they want your involvement in solving the problem, since many times, women just want to verbalise and share things to feel better. On the contrary, men are more likely to get shared problems fixed.

(viii) Show consistent respect and courtesy: Make sure your managers and supervisors understand the value of day-to-day recognition and are appropriately trained in expressing genuine respect for work and effort all year long.

(ix) Reward equally and fairly: If there is one thing that irritates anyone, male or female, is seeing someone receive a pay raise, an award, or some form of recognition when they feel deserving too. All organisations should establish clear quantitative or measurable criteria and parameters that are used to evaluate performance and distribution of rewards.

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