NIOS Class 10 Logistics & Supply Chain Management Chapter 14 Activities of Supply Chain Management

NIOS Class 10 Logistics & Supply Chain Management Chapter 14 Activities of Supply Chain Management Solutions to each chapter is provided in the list so that you can easily browse through different chapters NIOS Class 10 Logistics & Supply Chain Management Chapter 14 Activities of Supply Chain Management and select need one. NIOS Class 10 Logistics & Supply Chain Management Chapter 14 Activities of Supply Chain Management Question Answers Download PDF. NIOS Study Material of Class 10 Logistics & Supply Chain Management Notes Paper 258.

NIOS Class 10 Logistics & Supply Chain Management Chapter 14 Activities of Supply Chain Management

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Also, you can read the NIOS book online in these sections Solutions by Expert Teachers as per National Institute of Open Schooling (NIOS) Book guidelines. These solutions are part of NIOS All Subject Solutions. Here we have given NIOS Class 10 Logistics & Supply Chain Management Chapter 14 Activities of Supply Chain Management, NIOS Secondary Course Logistics & Supply Chain Management Solutions for All Chapters, You can practice these here.

Activities of Supply Chain Management

Chapter: 14

INTEXT QUESTIONS 14.1

1. __________ is the first stage of the supply chain process.

(a) Source.

(b) Make.

(c) Deliver.

(d) Plan.

Ans: (d) Plan.

2. Procurement teams work with both upstream and downstream of the supply Chain.

(a) True.

(b) False.

Ans: (a) True.

3. __________ estimates the number of production workers and equipment required to produce the products in a day/ week/month.

Ans: Capacity Planning.

4. Point-of-sale data allows for continuous __________ at the retail end of the supply chain.

Ans: Inventory Control.

INTEXT QUESTIONS 14.2

1. The interface between Retailer and distributor is known as __________.

(a) Manufacturing Cycle.

(b) Replenishment cycle.

(c) customer order cycle.

(d) Procurement cycle.

Ans: (b) Replenishment cycle.

2. he connection between manufacturer and supplier is known as __________.

(a) Manufacturing Cycle.

(b) Replenishment cycle.

(c) customer order cycle.

(d) Procurement cycle.

Ans: (d) Procurement cycle.

3. Customer order cycle is connected between __________ and __________.

(a) Customer, Retailer.

(b) Customer, Manufacturer.

(c) Customer, Distributor.

(d) Customer, supplier.

Ans: (a) Customer, Retailer.

4. Procurement cycle is connected between __________ and __________.

(a) Customer, Retailer.

(b) Distributor, Manufacturer.

(c) Retailer, Distributor.

(d) Manufacturer, supplier.

Ans: (d) Manufacturer, supplier.

5. Which of the following statements is false?

(a) Cycle view clearly defines processes involved and the owners of each process specify the roles and responsibilities of each member and the desired outcome of each process.

(b) The competitive strategy defines the set of customer needs which a firm seeks to satisfy through its products and services.

(c) Increasing inventory gives lower responsiveness but results in higher inventory carrying cost.

(d) Supply chain drivers determine the supply chain performance.

Ans: (c) Increasing inventory gives lower responsiveness but results in higher inventory carrying cost.

INTEXT QUESTIONS 14.3

1. The transfer of goods from a supplier to a client is known as __________.

(a) Information flow.

(b) Product flow.

(c) Financial flow.

(d) material flow.

Ans: (b) Product flow.

2. Credit terms, payment schedules, and consignment and title ownership agreements are all part of the __________.

(a) Information flow.

(b) Product flow.

(c) Financial flow.

(d) material flow.

Ans: (c) Financial flow.

3. The following one is Not a push process

(a) Customer order cycle.

(b) Replenishment cycle.

(c) Manufacturing cycle.

(d) Procurement cycle.

Ans: (a) Customer order cycle.

4. Choose the Correct Sequence:

(a) Plan- Source-Delivery-Make-Return.

(b) Return-Plan- Source-Make-Delivery.

(c) Return-Plan-Delivery-Source-Make.

(d) Plan- Source-Make-Delivery-Return.

Ans: (d) Plan- Source-Make-Delivery-Return.

TERMINAL EXERCISE

1. What are the five fundamental components of the supply chain process?

Ans: The five fundamental components of supply chain management are explained further below.

(i) Plan: The planning stage is the first stage of the supply chain process. In order to address how the products and services will fulfil the expectations and necessities of consumers, we must design a plan or strategy. At this point, the planning should primarily focus on developing a strategy that maximises profit. Companies must develop plans to manage all of the resources necessary for creating goods and offering services. The primary focus of supply chain management is on planning and generating a set of measurements.

(ii) Develop (Source): Following the planning, the next phase is to develop or source. At this time, we are primarily concerned with developing strong relationships with potential suppliers of raw materials which are used in production. This includes not only just choosing reliable suppliers, but also determining alternative shipping, delivery, and payment options for the goods. Companies must choose suppliers to get the raw materials for uninterrupted production. So, at this level, supply chain managers must develop a set of pricing, delivery, and payment protocols with suppliers, as well as Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for regulating and enhancing relationships. Finally, supply chain managers may integrate all of these procedures to manage their inventory of products and services. This includes receiving and inspecting shipments, as well as transporting them.

(iii) Make: The production or fabrication of items requested by the client is the third phase in the supply chain management process. The items are created, manufactured, tested, packaged, and synchronised for delivery at this step. The supply chain manager’s job here is to arrange all of the tasks necessary for production, testing, packing, and delivery preparation. This is the most metricintensive step of the supply chain, where enterprises may assess quality standards, production output, and labour productivity.

(iv) Deliver: The fourth and last stage is the delivery stage.

The provider delivers the merchandise to the client at the designated place. This is essentially the logistics stage, when consumer orders are approved and product delivery is scheduled. The delivery step is typically referred to as logistics, in which organisations collaborate to take client orders, construct a network of warehouses, choose carriers to transport items to customers, and set up an invoicing system to receive payments.

(v) Return: The return is the last stage in supply chain management. The consumer returns defective or damaged items to the supplier manufacturer at this step. Companies must deal with client inquiries and concerns, among other things. This level of the supply chain is frequently a source of contention for many businesses. Supply chain planners must devise a responsive and adaptable network for receiving damaged, faulty, and additional items from customers and expediting the return procedure for customers who have concerns with products.

2. Write the major flow of the supply chain.

Ans: Flow Types in Supply Chain Management: (i) The product flow, the information flow, and the financial flow are the three primary flows of supply chain management.

(ii) The Information Flow – The information flow focuses on conveying orders and updating delivery status.

(iii) The Financial Flow – Credit terms, payment schedules, and consignment and title ownership agreements are all part of the financial flow.

3. Elucidate the process view of the supply chain. 

Ans: Supply chains are made up of more than a few functional teams. They include purchasing, manufacturing, shipping, marketing, sales, and management. All of these categories operate to fulfil consumer demand or to compensate for any gaps in supply or demand.

(i) Supply: Suppliers deliver the raw materials in appropriate quantities and prescribed standards to manufacturers at the right mode of transportation. Supply companies may take use of bulk-buy discounts or seasonal supply-side surpluses to balance demand peaks or to protect against off-season pricing rises. However, the expense of holding and storing inventory items might offset any savings. Procurement teams work with both upstream and downstream functional teams. They make every effort to ensure material availability for processing activities while also keeping management and finance teams satisfied by preventing the building of surplus inventory stock.

(ii) Production: The purpose of manufacturing and processing activities is to utilise existing resources such as man, machine, and materials as efficiently as possible. To meet the future anticipated demand, the operations team may access direct sales forecasting information from sales, distribution, and even point of sale. Sales data and seasonal peaks can cause modifications in manufacturing schedules, and a concentration on certain inventory units can also change procurement Requirements.

(iii) Distribution: Distribution is to bring items to market through the most successful channels. Vendors and retailers must collaborate to identify when reordering is required to refill the distribution canter’s depleted inventory. End-to-end supply chain performance is an interconnected, collaborative effort in which managing customer and supplier relationships are crucial to the efficacy of the supply chain. Any inventory stock that is sitting in a warehouse might decay and become outdated. Distribution centres should only refill inventory supply when essential, not regularly.

(iv) Point-of-sale: Data allows for continuous inventory

control at the retail end of the supply chain. When another item of inventory is sold, the retailer tracks the information and shares it with upstream sales, distribution, production, and procurement organisations. Demand information is collected for identifying the time to replenish the orders in short lead times. It ensures the availability of products in-store and balances the supply and demand.

(v) Management: The expectation of Shareholders keeps their eyes on a good return on investment. The organisation should enhance the sales and offer optimum service levels to their stakeholders. As a result, an efficient supply chain relies on the management to interconnect with different functional units, departments, and partner organisations in all sectors. The efficient functioning of the whole supply chain becomes a primary goal for all stakeholders, especially during times of variable, seasonal, or unexpectedly high customer demand.

4. Draw the diagram of the supply chain process view.

Ans: 

5. Give an example of a Push and Pull view of the supply chain.

Ans: For example, Walmart uses data insights for inventory management, balancing the need to anticipate customer demand (push) with the need to respond quickly to real-time sales data (pull). This helps them enhance customer satisfaction, reduce waste, and increase revenue​​.

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