Class 10 English Chapter 4 Nelson Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom

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Class 10 English Chapter 4 Nelson Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom The answer to each chapter is provided in the list so that you can easily browse throughout different chapters NCERT Class 10 English Chapter 4 Nelson Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom and select need one.

Class 10 English Chapter 4 Nelson Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom

Also, you can read the SCERT book online in these sections Solutions by Expert Teachers as per SCERT (CBSE) Book guidelines. These solutions are part of SCERT All Subject Solutions. Here we have given Assam Board Class 10 English Chapter 4 Nelson Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom Solutions for All Subjects, You can practice these here…

Do yourself the remaining two topics

Writing 

1. Looking at contrast Nelson Mandela ‘s writing is marked by balance : many sentences have two parts in balance. 

Use the following phrases to complete the sentences given below. 

(i) They can be taught to love. 

(ii) I was born free. 

(iii) But the triumph over it. 

(iv) But he who conquers that fear. 

(v) To create such heights of character. 

1. It requires such depth of oppression —_———

2. Courage was not the absence of fear———

3. ‘The brave man is not he who does not feel afraid ——–

4. If people can learn to hate——

5. I was not born with a hunger to be free——–

Ans: 1. – to create such heights of character. 

2. – But the triumph over it. 

3. – But he who conquers that fear. 

4. – They can be taught to love. 

5. – I was born free. 

2.  This text repeatedly contrasts the past with the present or the future. We can use coordinated clauses to contrast two views, for emphasis or effect. Given below are sentences carrying one part of the contrast. Find in the text the second part of the contrast, and Complete each item. Identify the words which signal the contrast. This has been done for you in the first item.

1. For decades the union buildings had been the seat of white supremacy, and now _

2. Only moments before, the highest generals of the South African defence force and police _   saluted me and pledged their loyalty _. Not so many years before they would not salute _

3. Although that day neither group knew the lyrics of the anthem _ they would soon_

4. My country is rich in the minerals and gems that lie beneath its soil, _

5. The air show was not only a display of pinpoint precision and military force, but_

6. It was this desire for the freedom of my people _  that transform _into a bold one, that drove _ to become a criminal, that turned _ into a man without a home.

Ans: 1. _ it was the site of a rainbow gathering of diff colours and nations for the installation on of South Africa’s first democratic, non-racial government.

2. _ but arrested me.

3. _ know the words by heart.

4. _ but I have always known that its greatest wealth is its people, finer and truer than the  purest diamonds.

5. _ a demonstration of the military’s loyalty to democracy, to a new government that had been freely and fairly elected.

6. _ a frightened young man __ a law – abiding attorney _a family – loving husband __

3. Expressing your opinion Do you think there is colour prejudice in our own country? Discuss this with your friend and write a paragraph of about 100 to 150 words about this. You have the option of making your paragraphs a humorous one. (Read the short verse given below.)

When you were born you were pink

When you grew up you became white

When you are in the sun you are red

When you are sick you are yellow

When you are angry you are purple

When you are shocked you are grey

And you have the cheek to call me ‘coloured’.

Ans: 

Colour Prejudice

Everyone knows well that there is no colour prejudice in our country. Racism exists in some western countries. The white-skinned people belive that they are superior to the black skinned people. The colour of skin is natural. One cannot change it. But the blood is red. In hospitals blood from  blacks is infused to the body of a white-skinned patient and vice-versa. A doctor never differentiates between whites and blacks.

Obviously man’s colour is changed with the change of his mood.

Comprehension Questions and Answers

Question :- Read the passage carefully and answer the questions choosing appropriate alternatives.

1. Tenth may dawned bright and clear. For the past few days I had been pleasantly besieged by dignitaries and World leaders who were comings to pay their respects before the inauguration;n. The inauguration would be the largest gathering ever of international leaders on South African soil.

The ceremonies took place in the lovely sandstone amphitheatre formed by the Union building in Pretoria. For decades this hand been the sear of White supremacy, and now it was the site of a rainbow gathering of different colours and nations for the installation of South America first democratic, non-racial government.

Sl.No.Contents
1.A Letter to God
Dust of Snow
Fire and Ice
2.Nelson Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom
A Tiger in the Zoo
3.Two Stories About Flying
I.His First Flight
II.The Black Aeroplane
How to Tell Wild Animals
The Ball Poem
4.From the Diary of Anne Frank
Amanda!
5.The Hundred Dresses – I
6.The Hundred Dresses – II
Animals
7.Glimpses of India
I.A Baker from Goa
II.Coorg
III.Tea from Assam
The Trees
8.Mijbil the Otter
Fog
9.Madam Rides the Bus
The Tale of Custard the Dragon
10.The Sermon at Benares
For Anne Gregory
11.The Proposal

Questions :-

1. The world leaders came to South Africa to –

a) Meet Nelson Mendela.

b) Witness the ceremonies.

c) Congratulate South-Africans.

d) Pay their respects to the newly born democratic, non-racial government.

Ans: d) Pay their respects to the newly born democratic, non-racial government.

2. The ceremonies took place in –

a) The lovely sandstone amphitheatre.

b) The capital building

c) An open space

d) The GOVT. buildings.

Ans: a) The lovely sandstone amphitheatre.

3. The inauguration ceremony was held to –

a) Select the president of South Africa.

b) From the government.

c) Install South Africa first democratic, non-racial govt.

d) Honour Nelson Mandela.

Ans: c) Install South Africa first democratic, non-racial govt.

4. The leaders who were present there-

a) Represented the African nations.

b) Represented various tribes of Africa.

c) Were the friends of Nelson Mandela.

d) Were the world leaders.

Ans: d) Were the world leaders.

2. A few moments later we all lifted our eyes in awe as a spectacular array of South African jets, helicopters and troop carries roared in perfect formation over the Union building. It was not only a display of pinpoint precious and military force, but a demonstration of the military loyalty to democracy, to a new government that had been freely and fairly ele Ted. Only moments before, the highest generals of the South African defence force and police, their chests bedecked with ribbons and medals from days gone by, saluted me and pledged their loyalty. I was not unmindful of the fact that not so many years before they would not have saluted but arrested me. Finally a chevron of Impala jets left smoke trail of the black, red, green, blue and gold of the new South African flag.

Question :-

1. African jets, helicopter and troop carries roared-

a) All over the area.     

b) Here and there.

c) Off and on.            

d) In a perfect formation.

Ans: d) In a perfect formation.

2. The highest generals pledged their loyalty with-

a) Their salute to Nelson Mandela.

b) Their shouts.

c) Their military activities.

d) Their surrender to Nelson Mandela.

Ans: a) Their salute to Nelson Mandela.

3. The police would have-

a) Saluted him earlier.

b) Arrested him earlier.

c) Embraced him earlier.

d) Followed his command earlier.

Ans: b) Arrested him earlier.

4. The smoke trails of Impala jets symbolised-

a) Their victory.

b) The installation of a New Govt.

c) Non-racial government.

d) The new natio;nal flag of South Africa.

Ans: d) The new natio;nal flag of South Africa.

3. The policy of apartheid created a deep and lasting wound on my country and my people. All of us will spend many years, if not generations, recovering from that profound hurt. But the decades of oppression and brutality had another, unintended, effect, a d and that was that it produced the Oliver Tambos, the Walter sisulus, the chief luthis, the yusuf Dadoos, the Beam fichers, the Robbert sobukwes of our time men of such depths of oppression to create such heights of character. My country is rich in the minerals and gems that lie beneath its soil, but I have always known that its great wealth is its people, finer and truer than the purest diamonds.

Questions

1. The policy of apartheid created a-

a) Server problem in South Africa.

b) Deep and lasting wound in South Africa.

c) Minor technical problems.

d) Major political problem.

Ans: b) Deep and lasting wound in South Africa.

2. Great men of characters like Oliver thambos, Walter sisulus etc. We’re the resultant production of-

a) Patriotism.

b) Unity of the South African people.

c) Server oppression of the rulers.

d) Fight for freedom.

Ans: a) Patriotism.

3. The greatest wealth of the country was its-

a) Minerals and gems.  

b) Natural resources.   

c) Talented people.      

d) People.

Ans: b) Natural resources.

4. ‘Profound hurt’ means-

a) Abuse by the white people.

b) Hatred for the blacks.

c) Wound caused by the policy of apartheid.

d) Oppression of the rulers.

Ans: c) Wound caused by the policy of apartheid.

4. It is from these comrades in the struggle that I learned the mea ing of courage. Time and again, I have seen men and women risk and give their lives for an idea. I have seen men stand up to attacks and torture without breaking. Showing a strength and resilience that that defies the imagination. I learned that courage was not the absence of fear, but the triumph over it. The  brave man is not he who does not feel afraid, but he who  conquers that fear.

No  one is born hating another person because of the colour of his skin, or his back ground, or his religion. People must learn to hate, and if they can learn to hate, they can be taught to love, for love comes more naturally to the human heart than its opposite. Even in the grimmest times in prison, when my comrades and I were pushed to our limits, I would see a glimmer of humanity in one of the guards, perhaps just for a second, but it was enough to reassure me and keep me going. Man’s goodness is a flame that can be hidden but never extinguished.

Questions

1. The ‘ comrades’ means-

a) the speaker ‘s friends

b) the leaders of South Africa

c) the freedom fighters.

d) the speaker’ s friend who participated in the struggle with him-

Ans: d) the speaker’ s friend who participated in the struggle with him-

2. His comrades stood up to-

a) Oppression bravely.

b) Attacks normally

c) Their cause.

d) The freedom of their country.

Ans: a) Oppression bravely.

3. According to Mandela ‘courage’ means –

a) Boldness.

b) Fearlessness.

c) Enduring oppression.

d) Victory over fear.

Ans: d) Victory over fear.

4. What can people be taught?

a) To hate.

b) To love.

c) To be fearless.

d) To endure opposition.

Ans: d) To endure opposition.

5. In life, every man has twin obligations – obligations to his family, to his parents, to his wife and children, and he has an obligation to his people, his community, his country. In a civil and human society, each man is able to fulfil those obligations according to his own inclinations and abilities. But in a country like South Africa, it was almost impossible to for a man of my birth and colour to fulfil both those obligations. In South Africa, a man of colour who attempted to live as a human being eas punished and isolated. In South Africa, a man who tried to fulfil his duty to his people was inevitable ripped from his family and his home and was forced to live a live a life apart, a twilight existence of se ery and rebellion. I did not in the beginning choose to place my people above my family, but in attempting to serve my people. I found that I was prevented from fulfilling my obligations as a son, a brother, a father and a husband.

Question

1. In what kind of society can a man fulfill his obligations-

a) A democratic society.

b) A cultural society.

c) A civil and human society.  

d) A free society.

Ans: c) A civil and human society.

2. In South Africa people who tried to fulfill their obligations were –

a) Treated badly.

b) Sent to jails. 

c) Honoured.

d) Pushed and isolated.

Ans: d) Pushed and isolated.

3. What happened when Nelson Mandela attempted to serve his people?

a) He was welcomed to do so.

b) He was prevented from doing so.

c) He was punished.

d) He was honoured.

Ans: b) He was prevented from doing so.

4. The meaning of ‘ inclinations’ is –

a) Mental feelings.

b) Likings and dislikings.

c) Tendency to do something.

d) Natural tendencies of behaviour.

Ans:- d) Natural tendencies of behaviour.

Short Answers Type Question

1. Why does the author thank all the international guests? What does he pledge? 

Ans: In the sworn-in ceremony the author thanks all the international guests for having come to take possession with the people of South Africa of what is a common victory for justice, for peace and for human dignity. 

He pledges to liberate all their people from the continuing bondage of poverty, deprivation, suffering, gender and other discrimination. 

2. How did the South Africa jets, helicopter and troop carries perform on the occasion? 

Ans: On the auspicious occasion South Africa jets, helicopter and troop carriers were ready to display their performance. They roared in perfect formation spectacularly and flew over the Union Buildings. It was their loyalty to democracy and newly formed government. 

3. What does the author think of the African leaders? 

Ans: According to the author he himself is the product of all the African patriotic leaders. They fought for the freedom of the country and suffered from the oppression of the rulers. They made sacrifices. He feels sorry because they are not present today to see their harvest. 

4. What is the greatest wealth of the country? 

Ans: According to the author South Africa is rich in minerals and gems that lie beneath it’s soil. But the greatest wealth of the country is it’s people. They are finer and truer than the purest diamonds. 

5. What according to the author courage means? 

Ans: The author learnt the meaning of courage from his comrades. He learnt that courage is not simply fearlessness. But courage is triumph over fear. A brave man does not feel afraid but conquers fear. 

6. What are the twin obligations that every man have in life? 

Ans: The author feels that every man has twin obligations the first one is to his family, to his parents, to his wife and children and the second one is his obligations to his people, his community and his country. These can be fulfilled in a civil and human society. 

7. Why could not each man fulfill these obligations in South Africa? 

Ans: In South Africa colour prejudices prevailed. Whenever a black man tried to enjoy his social right or political right he was debarred from doing so. He was punished and isolated. So, the blacks failed to fulfill their obligations. 

8. Why did Nelson Mandela feel that his freedom was an illusion? 

Ans: Nelson Mandela understood that his freedom of boyhood days was an illusion. As soon as he became a young man his freedom had been taken from him. He longed for the basic and honourable freedoms of achieving his potential, of earning his keep, of marrying and having a family. His freedom should not be obstructed in a lawful life. He found that his freedom was curtailed. 

9. What does Nelson Mandela mean by freedom? 

Ans: According to Nelson Mandela freedom is indivisible. Freedom is free and common to all. The chains on anyone of his people were the chains on him and on all of them. So to be free himself is to make all countrymen free. 

Long Answer Type Questions

1. How does Nelson Mandela describe the scene of inauguration? 

Ans: Nelson Mandela gives a vivid description of the scene of inauguration . It was 10th May. The day was bright and clear. The inauguration took place in the lovely sandstone amphitheater formed by the Union Building in Pretoria. International leaders attended the ceremony. The highest defence and police personnel saluted him to show their loyalty to the country. Jets and helicopters flew over them leaving a trail of smokes of black, red, green, blue and gold colours resembling the national flag of South Africa. 

2. What does the author think of the policy of apartheid? 

Ans: According to the author the policy of apartheid created a deep and lasting wound in his country and his people. They would need many years to recover from the deep and strong hurt. But it had one plus point. Decades of oppression and brutality produced great leaders and freedom fighters like Oliver, Tambo, Walter Sisulus, Luthulis, Yusuf Dadoo, Bram Fischer and Robert Sobukwe etc. They were courageous men with wisdom and generosity. 

3.  What does the author say about the people who fought for the country’s independence? 

Ans: The author says that the country’s independence was due to the great sacrifices of thousand of his own people. He was the sum of all those African patriotic people. He regrets that many of them were not there to see the result of their sacrifices, the political freedom of South Africa. Their sacrifices can’t be repaid. He feels sorry because he can’t thank them. The policy of apartheid produced some great leaders. Those were men of courage, wisdom and generosity. 

4. When did the author begin to hunger for freedom and why? 

Ans: The author began to Hunger for freedom only when he could understand that his boyhood freedom was an illusion as he discovered that as a young man his freedom had already been curtailed. At first he longed for the transitory freedoms of this and that. But later in Johannesburg, he yearned for the basic and honorable freedoms of achieving his potential. But he felt that with him his brother and sisters were not free. So he joined the African national congress to attain freedom for his people to live their lives with dignity and self-respect that animates human life. 

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